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Fixing Windows Update on Windows 7


Generally speaking, the Windows Update mechanism usually just works. Updates are downloaded and installed usually without much fuss. In the home environment, it’s pretty rare that things will go wrong, since computers at home are less likely to come under heavy use and abuse. Most of the time at work I have no issues with Windows Update, despite the pounding the computers take in the school environment.

Sometimes however Windows Update gets broken. Malware infection, powering a computer off during the update process and hard disk corruption are some of the most likely culprits. I’ve found myself fixing a few computers in the last week at work that have developed faulty update mechanisms.

To fix the problem, there’s two tools I’ve used. System File Check is built into Windows, while the System Update Readiness (SUR) tool can be downloaded from Microsoft’s website. The first port of call is to simply run sfc /scannow from an elevated command prompt and let it scan the system. I’ve found this to fix some problems, and it serves as a good stepping stone for step 2.

Step 2 involves running the SUR tool. The SUR tool looks like a stand alone Windows Update, though it is actually scanning your computer’s Component Base Store for corruption and either fixing the issues, or logging the issues it can’t fix into a very useful log file. Depending on the speed of your computer and the number of faults, the process could take up to 20 minutes to complete.

If the computer still refuses to install updates after step 2, it’s time to check the SUR log to find out exactly what is wrong. Navigate to C:\Windows\Logs\CBS\CheckSUR.log and find out exactly what files or packages are causing the problem.

In the case of the computers at work, all of them were missing certain manifest files out of the C:\Windows\WinSxS directory. To fix the issue, I copied the same manifest files from a working PC and placed them into the C:\Windows\Temp\CheckSur\WinSxS\Manifests folder and reran the SUR tool. Checking the log file after the tool had run indicated that all the remaining problems had been fixed. After that, the problematic updates installed without issue.

Research on the internet indicates that things can be a whole lot more corrupt that what I experienced, but thankfully I had it easy. There’s a nice long article on the SUR tool as well as how to analyse the logs on here.

Although it is frustrating to deal with Windows Update issues, the mechanism is largely robust enough that with a little time and effort, you can fix just about any problem. Certainly a far cry from Windows Update errors and troubleshooting in Windows XP!

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