Home > Computer Hardware > SMART Board and USB port fun

SMART Board and USB port fun


Over the last two weeks, we’ve slowly been ramping up our classroom computer swap program at work. 6 year old Core 2 based computers with horrid chassis and power supplies are coming out, being replaced with first gen Core i3 boxes that are quieter, smaller and faster. However, a recent event almost threatened to derail the project.

I placed one of the replacement computers in a class, had it setup as per usual and all was going well. After rebooting however, I noticed that the SMART Board (model SB-680) was not behaving properly. The board was either vanishing just before the computer was fully booted into Windows, or the board would constantly reset and be basically unusable. Changing USB ports did hot help at all, they only gave a temporary fix that lasted until the next boot.

I got the reseller of the board involved to do deeper technical diagnostics, though in honesty it was more a case of handing the problem over to someone else. This past Friday afternoon they arrived and we started a long troubleshooting process. The board was hooked up to the techies laptop and after some time, it settled down and behaved normally. We then swapped out the controller card, swapped out the board itself and tested on the replacement PC. All to no avail, the problem kept coming back. We even tried a new USB booster cable and USB cable, same result.

In desperation, I went into the BIOS to change the USB settings for the newer classroom motherboards. The Intel DQ57TM motherboards had been running completely fine for the last 4 years without issues in both our computer labs, so I couldn’t understand why it would give issues now. They are all flashed to the latest firmware Intel offers, so there would be no fix that way. It turns out that one simple BIOS setting may have caused the issue.

When I setup the computer via network boot and install using Microsoft’s Deployment Toolkit, I had to set the USB Backward Compatibility option to Disabled in the BIOS, as the keyboard and mouse were non functional in Windows PE. After the whole install process was over, I didn’t bother to change the setting again, since I didn’t believe it would affect anything. Suffice to say, enabling the option caused Windows to install a whole bunch of extra USB root hubs and stuff after the reboot. In turn, this then let the SMART Board behave properly. Our reseller’s techie learned something new, as did I. Now I know that I must make sure the setting goes back to Enabled before installation in the classroom, so that headaches can be avoided.

The truly bizarre thing however is that the problem only seems to be triggered if the SMART Board is hooked up to the computer via an USB booster extension cable. If the board is close enough to the computer desk and doesn’t use the booster extension, the board seems to work fine with the setting at Disabled. I have 2 classrooms where such is the case, and neither of those rooms have reported issues with their boards since the school year started.

Another quirky problem to add to the knowledge base of fun when it comes to SMART Boards.

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