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Bandwidth buffet


For any person now in their late 20’s to early 30’s, the sound of a dial up modem should be a familiar, yet fading memory. Connecting to the internet more often than not meant listening to those squawking devices and hoping that the connection was clean and free of noise that would slow the connection down. As time went on, ADSL arrived, 3G arrived, HSDPA arrive, VDSL and now fibre have arrived. Slowly but surely, the trickle of data coming down the pipes has become a raging torrent, at least for those that can afford the higher speed options.

Driven by the laws of supply and demand, websites have evolved to become a lot more feature rich and complex than in years gone by. Images have gone from highly compressed gif and jpeg files into higher resolution jpeg and png files. Internet video, once an incredibly frustrating experience involving downloadable clips and QuickTime, Real or Windows Media Player has largely evolved into slick, easy to use web based players. Of course, video has also crept up from thumbnail size resolutions all the way up to the current 4K. It’s become really simple: the bigger your pipe, the more you are going to drink from the fountain by consuming rich media, online streaming and more. Creating and uploading content is also more viable than ever before, which means symmetrical connections are becoming far more important to the end user than they ever were before.

Take the following picture below, taken from my school’s firewall logs for 1 January – 30 April 2015:

Stats

That’s a total of 970GB of traffic on 1 ADSL line, the speed of which has fluctuated during the course of the year due to stability issues. We have another ADSL line which is only used by a few people, some phones and tablets, but I don’t have usage stats for that line. However, taken all together, our school has definitely used over 1TB of data in 4 months. At this rate, we may end up pushing close to 3TB by the year’s end. Also keep in note that these stats are without any wide scale WiFi available to students. I shudder to think of what the numbers will be once we have WiFi going, or even if we get a faster upload so that things like Dropbox, OneDrive and so on become viable.

Here’s a second interesting picture as well:

Stats2

Of all the web traffic going through the firewall, 82.5% of the traffic was unique or uncacheable due to its dynamic nature. In earlier days, caching statistics were higher since websites were less dynamic and had far more static HTML code, less scripts etc. That being said, the cache did at least manage to serve about 15% of the total web traffic. Every little bit helps when you are on a slow connection.

In the end, it all goes to show that the more bandwidth you have, the more applications and users are going to end up making use of it. Thankfully, bandwidth prices are much lower than they have ever been, though on some connections the speed is throttled to make sure that the end user doesn’t gorge themselves to the detriment of other users.

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