Home > Computer Hardware, General > Low end laptop pain

Low end laptop pain


In the course of my job, I’ve been asked on occasion to give feedback or a reccomendation to staff members regarding the purchase of a personal of family laptop. Unfortunately due to the ever changing nature of the IT field, the answers I give aren’t always what the person wants to hear.

I have two questions I ask the person before I make any recommendations:

  1. What do you intend to use the laptop for?
  2. What is your approximate budget for the laptop?
  3. How long do you intend to keep the laptop for?

The answer to the first question is usually a pretty generic answer: typing documents, surfing the internet, preparing lessons, doing research, check email. Using SMART Notebook also comes up now and then. Question 2 usually results in a range of about R4000-R6000 (roughly $380 – $550, exchange rates make this number fluctuate.) Question 3 results in a range of 3 years up to 5 or longer.

I often specify a laptop that is slightly over the asker’s budget, with a justification that spending slightly more results in a better quality laptop that lasts longer and is less likely to drive the person up the wall in the long run. Bottom of the line laptops have to cut so many corners that the experience is often highly frustrating. Low amounts of RAM, lowest end processors, slow mechanical hard drives, low resolution low quality screens, creaky plastic shells, poor trackpads and more leave  and taste in the mouth and that’s just on the hardware side of things. Software wise, the lowest end version of Windows is installed, including the Starter edition in the Windows 7 era. Bundled anti-virus applications, trial ware and lots of often bloated, unneeded software is pre-installed by the manufacturer in order to try and recoup costs and eke out some sort of profit.

Over the last few years, I’ve come to be a firm believer in the power of the SSD. With the right drive, it can often seem like you super charging a laptop that otherwise would need to be replaced due to age. It won’t completely mask age or low specs on a laptop, but it comes close. Windows starts faster, applications load quicker, battery life is extended, noise is reduced and user experience is often improved because you have less of the freezing/lockup sensation after boot. I don’t know if the drives will ever get as cheap as mechanical hard drives, but I believe that even a SATA3 based drive in most consumer laptops would go a long way to increasing user satisfaction across the board. Unfortunately, marketing still spreads the word that 1TB and larger drives are a good thing to have, when in reality not that many people are going to using all that space on a laptop.

As much as I’ve moaned about low quality laptops in this piece, I am reminded that it’s due to the flexibility of Windows that there is such a wide range of devices available at all cost points. From the most painful low end devices that are affordable to most people, all the way up to high end ultrabooks that are extremely pricey but have all the bells and whistles. Competition in the industry plus attrition has also helped to weed out some of the smaller or less interested players, as well as leading to a growing awareness that quality needs to increase in order to stand out against the competition. I can only hope that as time goes on, this trend continues and that the creaky poor machines of the past become nothing more than a bad memory.

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