Archive

Archive for April, 2016

Keeping Adobe Flash Player updated on a network

The Adobe Flash Player plugin is a pain in the arse. It’s a security nightmare, with more holes in the codebase than Swiss cheese. It seems every other week Flash makes the headlines when some or another security vulnerability is discovered and exploited. Cue the groans from network admins and users around the world as Flash has to be updated *yet* again. Unfortunately, one can’t quite get permanently rid of it just yet, as too many websites still rely on it. While you could get away with not using it at home, in a school where multiple people use a computer and visit different websites, one doesn’t have much choice really but to make sure Flash is installed.

On Windows 7 and below, the situation with Flash is a bit crazy. There’s a version for Internet Explorer (ActiveX plugin), a version for Firefox that is installed separately and Google Chrome bundles its own version – I’m not sure about smaller or niche browsers, but I think modern Opera inherits Flash via its relationship with Chrome’s engine. Thankfully with Windows 8 and above, Flash for Internet Explorer is distributed via Windows Update. It’s automatic and contains no 3rd party advertisements, anti-virus offers, browser bundling etc – all things Adobe have done in the past with their Flash installers. Trying to install Flash from Adobe’s website on Windows 8 and above will fail, which at least may help to kill off the fake Flash installer routine used by malware authors to trick unsuspecting users.

The usual method of installing Flash is highly cumbersome if you run a large network – not to mention that EXE files are much less flexible than MSI files for deployment and silent install options. Thankfully Adobe do make Flash Player in MSI format, but it’s not easy to get hold of directly. You have to sign a free enterprise deployment license to be able to legally distribute Flash and Reader in your organisation. The problem becomes how to distribute the updates especially if you aren’t running System Center or another product like that. Enter WSUS Package Publisher, indispensable if you make use of WSUS on your network.

WPP allows you to use the enterprise update catalogs Adobe and some other vendors offer. Using this, you essentially push the updates into your existing WSUS infrastructure, where it ends up delivered to the client computers like any other update. One thing you need to do is tweak the update as you publish it, so that it isn’t applicable to computers running Windows 8 upwards – if you don’t do this, the update will download on newer Windows versions, but will fail to install repeatedly and will need to be hidden. The other thing I’ve also discovered that needs to be fixed is that the silent install command line switch needs to be deleted. When a MSI file is delivered via WSUS, it is automatically installed silently. I discovered this the hard way, since one of the Flash updates I imported was failing to install on every computer. Turning on MSI logging and searching for the error code eventually lead me to discovering what was wrong, after which I corrected the problem and now know what to do with every new update that comes out for Flash.

Since using WPP, I’ve felt happier about the safety of my network, as I can usually get Flash pushed out with 2-3 days of the initial download. This is far better than having to visit each computer manually and keeping Flash up to date that way!

Curating digital photos

The rise of digital photography over the last 15 or so years has had many side effects. The most obvious is that analog film cameras have largely, though not completely vanished. No longer did you have to pay and wait for processing, hoping that your photos came out, or that you loaded the correct speed film. Digital gave you instant feedback either on the camera or once the files were transferred onto your computer.

My school is 59 years old as of this post. We have an archive of digital photos reaching back to the year 2000. The previous 43 years of school history is on film, but sadly most of whatever was taken was either lost or destroyed as the years went by. It seems there wasn’t much effort to archive and protect the slides and negatives at the time. While there are some slides and negatives, a large portion of the school’s history may be irredeemably lost. This is great pity, as what I have found, scanned and posted online has brought many happy memories back to people, most of whom may never have seen those photos.

Digital photos are far easier to store, backup and replicate to more than one location, which gives a huge amount of protection over analog slides and negatives. However, with the increase in megapixels and sensor quality over the years, combined with larger memory cards has lead to an unforeseen consequence: we have exponentially more photos now than we have ever had before. It’s so easy to take hundreds of shots of events now compared to the days of film when you were limited by how many spools you had and how much you were prepared to pay for developing and printing. Not only that, but since digital is now so ubiquitous, more people can contribute photos than ever before.

To give an example of this point: imagine a school sports day. Lots of activities all over the show that one photographer can’t cover on their own. Now imagine that there’s 5-10 students taking photos as well, covering all areas. Say each person takes 250 photos and suddenly you can end up with a total of 1500-2750 photos from one event – and that’s using a conservative figure. Obviously not all of these photos are going to be useful, which is where the time consuming art of weeding out the bad photos comes in. Most amateur student photographers I’ve spoken to never take the time to actually curate their photos. In fact, most staff members who have taken photos of school events haven’t done so either. It’s too easy to simply dump the whole contents of a memory card into a folder on the server and leave it there. This is what has happened with our digital archives over the years, to the point where we have something like 138000 files taking up over 480GB of space on our photos network share.

That number was a lot higher before I decided to take on the task of curating and cleaning up the mess the share had become. Not all of the files on the drive were photos, as I’ve deleted a number of Photoshop PSD’s, PowerPoint presentations, AVI and MP4 movie clips and other odds and ends. I’ve also deleted a huge amount of duplicates. Last week I brought home a fresh copy of all the files in the drive and imported it into Adobe Lightroom. It took a long time, but Lightroom calculated there was something like 128000 odd photos. I’m not sure about the discrepancy between that figure and what Windows Explorer tells me, but I think there may have been more duplicates that Lightroom ignored on import.

Now with the power of Lightroom, I’ve been able to really start going through some of the albums. I’ve curated 5 sub folders now, rejecting and deleting up to half of the photos in each case. Factors I look for when deleting photos include the following:

  • Focus. My most important metric really. 99% of the time, I’m going to delete out of focus photos.
  • Resolution. Photos of 640×480 or smaller are of no real use to us, even as an archive. I made the call to delete these, even if they are the only record of an event.
  • Motion blur. Too much of this ruins the photo. This usually occurs because shutter speed is too slow and it leads to a strange looking photo.
  • Framing. Things like cut off heads, people too distant, people partially in the edges of photos and so forth usually end up being binned.
  • Damaged files. Caused by bit-rot or due the camera/memory card being faulty, these are tossed.
  • Noise. Too much digital noise due to high ISO speeds or older sensors lead to very unpleasant, soft and noisy photos. I rescue where I can, but otherwise these too are binned.
  • RAW files. RAW files are fantastic for many things, but as part of an archive they are problematic. Every camera manufacturer has their own RAW format, which doesn’t always open well in 3rd party software. The alternative DNG format as created by Adobe is an option, but unless you take extra steps, they aren’t easily viewable. By contrast, JPEG files are universal and can be opened on just about any platform in existence.
  • Severe over or under exposure. Files that are extremely exposed in either direction are usually useless, especially if they are in JPEG form right out the camera.
  • Too similar photos. When you take photos in burst mode, you’ll often end up with many photos that are near identical, often only with small variations between frames. I usually pick the best 1 or 2 of the lot and delete the rest. This is especially true in sports/action shots.

I still have an incredibly long way to go. I’ve deleted well over 20000 files by now, but a mountain is still in front of me. Of course, as 2016 goes on and more photos get added to the 2016 archive, that mountain is only going to grow. Still, I’ve made a start and I am happy with what I’ve done so far. Thanks to the process, I’ve been able to upload many albums of decent, usable photos to our Facebook pages so that pupils, parents and staff can view, tag, share and download them.

In closing, I would suggest that any person who enjoys their photo collection to take the time to properly curate said collection. It isn’t always easy to delete photos, especially if they are the only one of a special event/person. However, unless one learns to be decisive, the collection is just going to eventually grow to the point of overwhelming you. Take time to savour the quality, not the quantity.