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Archive for July, 2016

Salvaging old equipment a.k.a dumpster diving

Last week I watched a couple of videos on YouTube where old computers were rescued from the kerb or dumpsite and refurbished for use. This saves on e-waste and also provides cheap computers to those who cannot afford a new machine. This got me thinking about all the equipment I have discarded, sold or donated while at my school, as well as the actual value of refurbishing old equipment.

As time has gone on, I estimate I’ve gotten rid of over 100 old computers, ± 40 projectors, ± 20 printers and countless individual parts such as dead hard drives, power supplies, motherboards etc. Some of this went into the the trash, while others were donated or sold off to raise some funds for the school. In fact, we cleaned up 6 computers for sale over the first week of holidays. However, the process is time consuming, especially with old equipment like that. The process goes something like this:

  • Physically inspect the chassis to look for loose panels, missing screws, worn/sticky buttons etc.
  • Open the chassis and blow out all the dust using our air compressor, then perform a visual inspection of the motherboard, looking for swollen/blown capacitors, loose cable connections etc.
  • Power on the PC and listen for fans that need lubrication. Most often this is the power supply, graphics card or the chassis fan. Fans that grind are a sure sign of that fan seizing up completely in the not too distant future.
  • Perform lubrication on the fans that require it, which means removing the part from the PC to get to the fan lubrication cover.
  • Install as much RAM as possible as well as a working DVD drive if required.
  • Wipe the hard drive and install Linux Mint/FreeDOS as a free operating system, as we cannot sell the computers with Windows on them.
  • Leave the PC running for a while to determine minimum stability.

This leaves us with a working PC, but it is time consuming, even if it only needs minimal checks and a dust blow out.

It made me think about how far back one can and should go with refurbishing old PC’s. While there are plenty of Pentium 4 and Pentium D based computers out there, they have the disadvantage of running very hot, using a lot of electricity and in the P4’s case, are single threaded chips. Coupled with IDE or SATA1 speed hard drives and the computer is unpleasant to use, even with a freshly installed operating system. Again, while this will provide a computer to a charity or needy person who has never had one before, the economics of using such an old machine weighs heavily against it.

Printers are easier, in the sense that they generally just need a new toner or ink cartridge(s). The problem with older devices though are if they are using the now defunct Paralell Port, or as HP loves to do, not provide drivers for modern versions of Windows. I had to replace all our old HP Laserjet 1018’s in the school because they flat our refused to run stably under Windows 7. I’ve got a 4 colour laser MFP in the office that I have to discard, as the device will not behave properly under anything newer than Windows Vista at best. HP have not put out modern usable drivers for this machine, instead reccomending that you buy a modern, supported printer. This to me is a tragedy, as the device has less than 8000 pages on the counter. There is nothing physically wrong with the machine, but unless we run it on an old version of Windows, it’s become little more than a glorified door stop.

Projectors have the problem of either having their lamps require replacing, colour wheel dies (DLP projectors only) or there’s a problem with the internal LCD panels on LCD models. When you ask for a quote on repair or a new lamp, it actually becomes more cost effective to buy a new projector rather than repair the existing one. Not to mention, most older projectors won’t have modern ports like HDMI or network ports on them, so they are less useful in today’s changing world.

In the end, this is all part of the vicious cycle of technological progress. Unless we can somehow convince manufacturers to better support their products, we are going to be locked into producing tons of e-waste. Reusing old computers is a good start, but there also comes a point where it is no longer viable to use older equipment. One thing that could definitely be improved is much more visibility for e-waste recyclers. Equipment can be properly stripped and salvaged by these firms, who then get the components properly recycled and also avoid polluting areas with toxic chemicals that leech out of electronics as they decompose. It would also help if more people took an interest in repairing their own stuff if it breaks, rather than just throwing it away. There’s a thrill that comes from fixing something with your own hands, a thrill that more people should want to experience.

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