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UEFI booting observations

It’s exam time at my school, which means that things quieten down a bit during said period. This leaves me with some free time during the day to experiment and learn new things, or attempt to do things I have long wanted to do but have not had the time. I’ve used the time during this last week to play around with deploying Windows 7 and 10 to PC’s for the purpose of testing their UEFI capabilities. While Windows 7 can and does UEFI boot, it really doesn’t gain any benefits over BIOS booting, unlike Windows 8 and above. I was more interested in testing out the capabilities of these motherboards, so I could get a clearer idea of hardware issues we may have when we move to Windows 10.

Our network comprises of only Intel based PC’s, so all my experiences so far are based off of that particular point. What I’ve found so far boils down to this:

  • Older generation Intel 5 & 6 chipset series motherboards from Intel themselves are UEFI based, but present interfaces that look very much like the traditional console type BIOS. The only real clue is that under the Boot section, there is an option to turn on UEFI booting.
  • These older motherboards don’t support Secure Boot or the ability to toggle on and off the Compatibility Support Module (CSM) – the UEFI version on these boards predate these functions.
  • I have been unable to to UEFI PXE network boot the 6 series motherboard, haven’t yet tried the 5 series boards. While I can UEFI boot the 6 series to a flash drive/DVD/hard drive, I cannot do so over the network. Selecting the network boot option boots the PC into what is essentially BIOS compatibility mode.
  • The Intel DB75EN motherboard has a graphical UEFI, supports Secure Boot and can toggle the CSM on and off. Interestingly enough though, when the CSM is on, you cannot UEFI PXE boot – the system boots into BIOS compatibility mode. You can only UEFI PXE boot when the CSM is off. This is easy to tell as the network booting interface looks quite different between CSM and UEFI modes.
  • Windows 7 needs the CSM mode turned on for the DB75EN motherboards if you deploy in UEFI mode, so that it can boot, at least from what I’ve found from using PXE boot. If you don’t turn CSM on, the boot will either hang at the Windows logo or will moan about unable to access the correct boot files. I have yet to try and install Windows 7 on these boards from a flash drive in UEFI mode to see what happens in that particular scenario.
  • I haven’t yet had a chance to play with the few Gigabyte branded Intel 8 series motherboards we have. These use Realtek network cards instead of Intel NICs. I’m not a huge fan of Gigabyte’s graphical UEFI, as I find it cluttered and there’s a lot of mouse lag. I haven’t tested a very modern Gigabyte board though, so perhaps they’ve improved their UEFI by now.

UEFI Secure Boot requires that all hardware supports pure UEFI mode and that the CSM be turned off. I can do this with the boards where I’m using the built in Intel Graphics, as these fully support both CSM mode and pure UEFI. Other PC’s with Geforce 610 adapters in them don’t support pure UEFI boot, so I am unable to use Secure Boot on them, which is somewhat annoying, as Secure Boot is good for security purposes. I am probably going to need to start making use of low end Geforce 700 series cards, as these support full UEFI mode, so will support Secure Boot as well.

It’s been a while since we bought brand new computers, but I will have to be more picky when choosing the motherboards. Intel is out of the motherboard game and I am not a fan of Realtek network cards either – this does narrow my choices quite a bit, especially as I also have to be budget conscious. At least I know that future boards will be a lot better behaved with their UEFI, as all vendors have had many years now to adjust to the new and modern way of doing things.

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