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Upgrading Windows 10 via WSUS

November 15, 2016 Leave a comment

Windows 10 is supposedly the “last” consumer Windows edition Microsoft will release. While the version will stay as 10, over time the whole OS will mature, grow and mutate into something that will look and feel very different from the original release of July 2015. One side effect of this is that in a corporate environment using WSUS, it becomes possible for new versions of Windows 10 to be deployed as an in place fully automatic upgrade, the same way any other patch or service pack is installed. I was curious to see how this worked, so I approved the Anniversary Update (also known as version 1607) for installation at work and let my PC download the update.

Sure enough, the process was the same as what my home PC went through when it upgraded to the 1607 update. A couple of update screens and quite some time later, I was back at my desktop, duly upgraded. Everything was still in place, bar the RSAT pack which had to be updated to a version compatible with v1607. Overall, an extremely smooth and hands free process, just time consuming. I imagine it would easily take twice or thrice as long if the machine runs on a mechanical HD and not a SSD.

That being said, there was one major problem with the 1607 update – checking for updates from WSUS broke due to a bug in 1607. Windows 10 1607 would start to search for updates from the configured WSUS server, only to have multiple services in the background crash repeatedly, with no indication to the user. To the end user, it simply looks like the search is stuck at 1% and never moves from there. Apparently, if one leaves the process running long enough, updates will eventually download. This is obviously an unacceptable bug and Microsoft were made aware of it. They promised a fix in one of the monthly update roll ups, which was subsequently delivered and verified as having fixed the problem. Now you have a chicken and egg situation: deploy the 1607 update via WSUS, but then struggle after that, since you need the Cumulative Update to fix the problem.

You could manually install the update, but this becomes unwieldy in a large organisation. If deploying Windows 10 via deployment tools, you could make sure that the base image has the update injected already, which prevents the issue from cropping up in the first place. Sadly, the 1607 update is delivered from WSUS as an encrypted ESD file. While it is possible to decrypt this and inject the update, I don’t know if it’s possible to convert that back in to an ESD file. Even if you could, the checksum wouldn’t be valid and WSUS would probably fail to work with the modified file.

There’s always a possibility Microsoft could revise the 1607 update in WSUS so that the ESD file comes with the last Cumulative Update installed so that it works correctly out the box. I recall something like this happening with the November 1511 update, which I declined as it was another 3-4 GB download. Unfortunately, one doesn’t know when or even if this will happen. It’s also possible the problem will never be fixed. With the Creators Update due out early 2017 (March?) it’s possible that Microsoft uses that as the new baseline. If I’m correct, once the Creators Update is approved in the WSUS console, it will supersede the Anniversary Update, so the problem should be solved by bypassing the 1607 update.

I look forward to eventually rolling out Windows versions like this, though I think it will be beneficial if every computer had a SSD inside it first. Mechanical hard drives really do slow things down these days. A nice side effect of this is that Windows shouldn’t end up suffering from “Windows rot” as the Windows directory is replaced with each major upgrade. This should keep performance up compared to something like Windows 7 that gets bogged down after years worth of updates. Interesting times ahead…

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The Windows 10 upgrade experience

On Wednesday 29 July 2015, a new chapter opened up in the history of Microsoft’s Windows. Windows 10 was unleashed on the world, Microsoft’s attempt to remedy the largely cool reaction to Windows 8, as well as stay relevant (at least in the eyes of a lot of tech bloggers) in the new app centric world. The return of the Start Menu, an unprecedented public participation process via the Windows Insider program, free upgrades for a year, DirectX 12 for gamers and many more features all combined to build up a hype that has not been seen for a long time in the Windows world.

Like millions of other people, I reserved my copy of the Windows 10 upgrade via the app in the system tray that appeared after a round of Windows Updates a few months back. The idea was that this application would trickle download Windows 10 in the background as soon as the system went RTM, so that on launch day you’d be ready to upgrade immediately. Only problem is that the trickle download process started 1-2 days before the launch of Windows 10, which meant that with my slow ADSL speed, it would be some time before I’d be ready to go, let alone the chance that I’d be in one of the later waves of the rollout. This is probably due to the fact that build 10240 only went RTM 2 weeks before the global rollout. Either way, I was impatient to get going.

Thankfully Microsoft thought clearly and made ISO images available for direct download or via the Windows 10 Media Creation Tool. I snagged a copy of the Media Creation Tool and used it to download a copy of Windows 10 at work, where I have access to a faster internet connection. Once the ISO file was built by the tool, I burned it to DVD for 3 other staff members who were interested. It’s legal to do this by the way, since each person would be having their own upgrade key made during the upgrade process. For myself, I used the excellent Rufus utility to burn the image to a flash drive. Although the Media Creation Tool can burn the image to flash drive, I’ve come to trust Rufus, especially thanks to its ability to create properly booting UEFI capable media.

Once at home, I simply inserted the flash drive, double clicked on setup.exe and let the upgrade process run. I had previously been running Windows 8.1 with all updates applied. The installation process ran smoothly and took about half an hour to move all my files, upgrade itself and get to the desktop. All of my software remained installed and I haven’t yet had any compatibility issues software wise. I did have some issues with my PC’s built in Bluetooth adapter, but a couple of hours after the upgrade, a driver had been installed in the background and the adapter was good to go again. After the upgrade, I did manually install Nvidia’s latest graphics driver, since I already had it downloaded and couldn’t wait on Windows Update to deliver the driver.

So far, I mostly like Windows 10. It’s been stable despite the upgrade, no blue screens or crashes. As mentioned, all my software has remained in working without issue. Speed wise it feels a little faster than Windows 8.1, but not much. The speed may be more impactful on users coming from Windows 7 or earlier. My biggest real gripe at the moment with Windows 10 is the severe regression in the OneDrive client, a very well moaned about topic on the net. Windows 8 and 8.1 spoiled me in that regards with placeholder sync that let me see the files that were on my OneDrive, without actually needing to download them. The Windows 10 version basically takes us back to the Windows 7 version of the client where you have to chose which folders and files to sync, which will then chew up space on your hard drive. I am not happy at all with this change, but I am holding out that the new client that should be here by the end of the year will offer a better experience.

One small note: my copy of Windows 10 wouldn’t activate until a day after the install. While I kept thinking that somehow it was related to my Windows 8.1 key, it was simply a case of the fact that the activation servers were getting hammered into oblivion. Over 14 million people upgraded in the first 24 hours, so I am not surprised that I struggled to activate. I am assuming that now, almost 2 weeks later, activation should be happening immediately as per normal again.

It’s been a common refrain that I’ve seen on the net from reviews that if there’s one thing Windows 10 needs, it’s that it needs more polish. Lots of little fit and finish issues keep cropping up older legacy parts of Windows are moved into the modern framework. Different right click menus, a System Settings App that isn’t quite Control Panel yet, out of place icons etc. all need some time and attention before Windows 10 becomes its own unique system. With the promise of Windows as a Service, it’s likely that many of these issues will go away with time as the system keeps being updated and improved. One thing is for sure, it’s going to be an interesting ride indeed.